A law firm, Baker & Hostetler, has done something risky yet ground breaking, the law firm has hired IBM’s AI Ross, the first artificially intelligent lawyer.

Ross was created by IBM and was built on the popular Watson. Ross is able to read and understand language, create hypotheses when asked questions, do research, and give back responses with references. Ross also learns from experience, can increase response speeds and the more it is interacted with the more knowledge it gains, something that’s becoming very common in modern day AIs.

The website Rossintelligence.com says, “You ask your questions in plain English, as you would a colleague, and ROSS then reads through the entire body of law and returns a cited answer and topical readings from legislation, case law and secondary sources to get you up-to-speed quickly.”

Baker & Hostetler is one of the biggest law firms in the country and have hired Ross to work on bankruptcy cases. Ross will work as a legal researcher, being able to dig through thousands of legal documents. So while Ross may not be present at court or make legal decisions, the AI will be able to cut the time it takes humans to shift through legal documents.

In addition to Baker & Hostetler there are other firms that are seeking to hire Ross. There are others like Ross out there such as Legal by Lex Machina, which mines public court documents to predict how a judge will rule in particular cases; another is CaseText, which digs through thousands of state and federal legal cases to provide data. There is a trend in creating AI that can help dig through, analyze, and provide relevant information faster than humans can.

This push in AI is already making its way to various markets, not just in tech, therefore its likely that we’ll see a shift in jobs. Take Ross for example, Ross does a faster and one can say will do a better job at analyzing and shifting through legal documents, a job that is often given to recent graduates, which for many can be a stepping stone to better opportunities. While AIs can be very beneficial we are starting to see a shift in job placements, the only problem is that its happening too fast.